Behind the scenes at the Museum of Frederick County History, Taney House, and Research Center & Archives with the people who work there.

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In honor of Labor Day, we’re highlighting some of the many hardworking men and women from Frederick County’s past. Click the pics for more info.

Browse our online photo collection.

Yesterday, Carrie was packing up this gorgeous quilt made in 1848, preparing it and the rest of a recent donation to go into storage.

Third row: two tags with the quilt’s history. The second one was written on fabric and sewn onto the back of the quilt by its most recent private owner. She sewed it on in a way that will make it easy to take the tag off in the future, if needed.

Carrie always tries to pack textiles into thirds so she doesn’t pack it along the old fold lines. The more a textile is folded in the same places, the weaker those fold lines become. 

She also layered the quilt with unbuffered tissue paper, and lightly scrunched unbuffered tissue paper supports the textile at the folds.

Finally, she packed the the quilt into its own acid-free box. The box gives the quilt its own environment where it will be very happy for a long time. The unbuffered tissue paper lining the box will be used as a sling to gently lift the quilt when it is taken out.

Have you taken any beautiful pictures related to Frederick County history lately? Submit them to our Byerly‐Rothwell Photography Contest! We’re taking entries until Friday.

Click for more info.

This week’s #TBT photo was part of the B&O Railroad complex in Brunswick. Do you know what the building was?

Bonus points if you know what is there now!

foto-biene:

Frederick County, MD 2013
Torn down shortly after this was taken

readjustinghersails:

exploring frederick county’s covered bridges.

mdhsphotographs:

Revolutionary [War] barracks
Frederick, Maryland
September 1936
E.H. Pickering
Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS) Collection
Maryland Historical Society
PP85.238.1
PP85.238.2

"The Historic American Buildings Survey is the nation’s first federal preservation program, begun in 1933 to document America’s architectural heritage." Read more about how the American Institute of Architects, Library of Congress, and National Park Service formed HABS on the NPS site.

MdHS purchased a set of the HABS collection from Library of Congress in 1965.

Browse through HABS photographs on the Library of Congress site. 

destroyed-and-abandoned:

Long neglected church on Lime Kiln Road, Frederick County, MD.

Source: podolux (flickr)

jimkeeley:

The Best Farm, Monocacy National Battlefield, Frederick, Maryland

The Best Farm comprises the southern 274 acres of what was originally a 748-acre plantation known as L’Hermitage, and was home to Victoire Vincendière. More

Our next #MuseumCat is Major Johnson Pope Gilbert, who lived at two shops on North Market Street in Frederick.
In the late 1800’s Thomas E. Pope made 20 North Market Street (pictured here) his home and business. Thomas Pope operated a tobacco wholesale and retail store, a trade that he most likely learned from his father John, who also was a tobacconist. In the 1890’s George Gilbert operated his boot and shoe store along side Pope’s shop. Though both men were doing a profitable business it seems that their cat named Major Johnson Pope Gilbert was monopolizing most of the headlines. 
The first appearance that features the Major in the newspaper, is his celebrated return home on July 25, 1894, after a disappearance of a few days. The Major makes the news once again on April 13, 1894… 

A Distinguished Cat 
Major Johnson Pope Gilbert is the name of a fine large cat which has for sometime past made its headquarters at the store of Geo. A. Gilbert, on North Market street. Major is about nine years of age and weighs thirteen and one-half pounds. He is well known about the neighborhood and is generally looked upon as a privileged character. Major makes frequent visits about meal time to the residence of Thos. E. Pope, but soon comes home and takes his afternoon nap. He is generally peaceful and quiet, but if tantalized will make it unpleasant for his aggressor. 

Sadly, on September 14, 1895, the newspaper posts Major Johnson Pope Gilbert’s obituary. 

Death of The Major 
The fine large pet cat known as “Major Pope Gilbert,” and familiar to almost everyone on North Market street, died a few days ago., much to the sorrow of its friends. The cat was between ten and eleven years old and made its home at the stores of Messers. Geo. A. Gilbert and Thomas E. Pope. During the past few years it became too old to find food and was well taken care of by its masters. 

The Major must have been a very distinguished cat indeed to be remember by all of his friends and by us a 119 years later. 
- Jennifer Winter, Museum Operations Coordinator

Our next #MuseumCat is Major Johnson Pope Gilbert, who lived at two shops on North Market Street in Frederick.

In the late 1800’s Thomas E. Pope made 20 North Market Street (pictured here) his home and business. Thomas Pope operated a tobacco wholesale and retail store, a trade that he most likely learned from his father John, who also was a tobacconist. In the 1890’s George Gilbert operated his boot and shoe store along side Pope’s shop. Though both men were doing a profitable business it seems that their cat named Major Johnson Pope Gilbert was monopolizing most of the headlines. 

The first appearance that features the Major in the newspaper, is his celebrated return home on July 25, 1894, after a disappearance of a few days. The Major makes the news once again on April 13, 1894… 

A Distinguished Cat 

Major Johnson Pope Gilbert is the name of a fine large cat which has for sometime past made its headquarters at the store of Geo. A. Gilbert, on North Market street. Major is about nine years of age and weighs thirteen and one-half pounds. He is well known about the neighborhood and is generally looked upon as a privileged character. Major makes frequent visits about meal time to the residence of Thos. E. Pope, but soon comes home and takes his afternoon nap. He is generally peaceful and quiet, but if tantalized will make it unpleasant for his aggressor. 

Sadly, on September 14, 1895, the newspaper posts Major Johnson Pope Gilbert’s obituary. 

Death of The Major 

The fine large pet cat known as “Major Pope Gilbert,” and familiar to almost everyone on North Market street, died a few days ago., much to the sorrow of its friends. The cat was between ten and eleven years old and made its home at the stores of Messers. Geo. A. Gilbert and Thomas E. Pope. During the past few years it became too old to find food and was well taken care of by its masters. 

The Major must have been a very distinguished cat indeed to be remember by all of his friends and by us a 119 years later. 

- Jennifer Winter, Museum Operations Coordinator